His Incredible Song Will Give You A New Perspective On This Beloved Classic

While we don’t often sit and think about movie soundtracks until the Grammys and Oscars roll around, film scores are critical pieces of the cinematic puzzle.

Imagine Titanic without the driving force of Celine Dion’s iconic voice. Imagine what all of those Disney movies would be like without the songs that made up the soundtrack of your childhood. Imagine your favorite films in total musical silence.

One of the most beloved songs of all is “Over The Rainbow,” which is forever tied to the story of Dorothy’s trip down the Yellow Brick Road. Because it’s a classic, artists over the years have created their own versions of the time-honored track. Take rising musician Chase Holfelder, for example. By singing the song in a minor key, he turns Dorothy’s world into something that is at once intriguing and unsettling.

It’s pretty amazing how such a simple change forces us to see one of our favorite films in an entirely new light.

To learn more about Chase Holfelder’s music, be sure to check him out on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you can’t get enough of his voice, follow him on YouTube!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/chase-holfelder/

You Might Recognize These Movies, But Once The Music Starts, They’ll Never Be The Same

Classic dance numbers in movies are unforgettable. Who can forget seeing Gene Kelly spinning around that light post in Singin’ In The Rain? It’s a scene that will live on in cinema history forever.

Well, one creative mind decided to mash up these classic dance moves with contemporary music. In the process, this creator breathed new life into the performances we all know and love.

Even though “Uptown Funk” was only released earlier this year, it has a timeless feel that goes perfectly with these awesome routines. People should do things like this more often! It’s always good to nod to the performers who still inspire dancers and musicians to this day.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/dance-mashup/

We All Love These Pixar Films, But Have You Ever Noticed What They’re Hiding?

Say what you want about life imitating art, but you really can’t argue with the fact that art imitates itself every now and again. Just ask the creators over at Pixar. You’ve probably seen most of their movies, but did you know that some of their most popular films pay homage to the greats of cinema past?

Movies like Toy Story, Up, and The Incredibles are filled to the brim with references to some of the most beloved films of all time.

The parallels might not be obvious at first, but looking at the productions with a discerning eye reveals the level of influence that these revered blockbusters have had on Pixar’s greatest hits over the years.

After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

To see more of these parallels in action, check this out:

(via Design Taxi)

Pretty amazing, right? It’s easy to watch Pixar movies with idle, cartoon-loving eyes, but the next time they roll out another classic, be on the lookout for allusions to your favorite cinematic standbys.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/pixar-tributes/

Did You Know That Big Budget Movies Actually Copy Scenes All The Time?

Director Ed Wood was infamous for piecing together stock footage to complete his low-budget films. As a result, his cult classic Plan 9 from Outer Space is widely regarded as, well, the worst movie of all time. But he’s not the only director guilty of copying and pasting to save a buck.

It’s no surprise that producing a blockbuster tends to cost a studio tons of cash. Even the smallest special effect can add up to thousands (or millions) of dollars, so it’s kind of understandable why they might try to cut a corner here and there. But when the movie connoisseurs over at Screen Rant took a second look at these big-budget films, they couldn’t help but think the producers probably could have been a bit more subtle. Each one was caught giving their audience a strange sense of déjà vu:

1. This is actually one of the least terrible things about the unfortunate prequel franchise.

2. Michael Bay got hit with a truth bomb when people noticed something eerily familiar in the Transformers franchise to one of his earlier films.

3. Set phasers to stun…ningly obvious.

4. The film may have been based on a video game, but most of the backstory was taken from Jessica Alba’s debut show.

5. Film execs wanted a happier ending for Ridley Scott’s 1989 classic Blade Runner

So they spliced in the ironically idyllic intro from Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 thriller, The Shining.

6. Even film virtuoso Orson Welles borrowed stock footage for his iconic film, Citizen Kane.

Notice the unusually large birds flying around in this picnic scene? Rumor has it they’re actually from the 1933 film, Son of Kong.

7. Bill and Ted might not have time traveled back quite as far as they thought for this scene.

8. Back in the day, Disney animators frequently reused old frames for new films.

(via Mental Floss)

If you think about it, your next movie ticket could really be a two-for-one deal. But somehow, I’d still feel short-changed.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/movies-reuse-footage/