If You Thought ‘The Exorcist’ Was Scary, Wait Until You Hear The Film’s Original Score

Perhaps one of the greatest scary movies of all time, The Exorcist was a horror show before the film even made it to theaters. Several big Hollywood producers of the time turned it down (including Kubrick), the crew became sick with mysterious illnesses, and the toddler of one of the main actors was hit by a motorbike.

Many in the industry believed the film to be “cursed.”

Another setback to production was the fact that the film’s original score made people actually want to vomit. Composer Lalo Schifrin (who also wrote the Mission: Impossible theme) went all out for the original trailer music. The heaviness of the sounds combined with the intense flashing images allegedly caused viewers to run to the bathrooms.

You’ve been warned…here’s the original trailer for The Exorcist, which caused Warner Bros. to demand director William Friedkin fire Schifrin.

And here is more from Schifrin’s expertly creepy score.

(via Dangerous Minds)

Rumor has it that Friedkin was so distraught about the studio’s reaction that he took the audio reels and literally threw them out of the window. He decided then to use modern classical compositions to score his movie, most notably the track “Tubular Bells” by Mike Oldfield.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/exorcist-score/

Did You Know That Big Budget Movies Actually Copy Scenes All The Time?

Director Ed Wood was infamous for piecing together stock footage to complete his low-budget films. As a result, his cult classic Plan 9 from Outer Space is widely regarded as, well, the worst movie of all time. But he’s not the only director guilty of copying and pasting to save a buck.

It’s no surprise that producing a blockbuster tends to cost a studio tons of cash. Even the smallest special effect can add up to thousands (or millions) of dollars, so it’s kind of understandable why they might try to cut a corner here and there. But when the movie connoisseurs over at Screen Rant took a second look at these big-budget films, they couldn’t help but think the producers probably could have been a bit more subtle. Each one was caught giving their audience a strange sense of déjà vu:

1. This is actually one of the least terrible things about the unfortunate prequel franchise.

2. Michael Bay got hit with a truth bomb when people noticed something eerily familiar in the Transformers franchise to one of his earlier films.

3. Set phasers to stun…ningly obvious.

4. The film may have been based on a video game, but most of the backstory was taken from Jessica Alba’s debut show.

5. Film execs wanted a happier ending for Ridley Scott’s 1989 classic Blade Runner

So they spliced in the ironically idyllic intro from Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 thriller, The Shining.

6. Even film virtuoso Orson Welles borrowed stock footage for his iconic film, Citizen Kane.

Notice the unusually large birds flying around in this picnic scene? Rumor has it they’re actually from the 1933 film, Son of Kong.

7. Bill and Ted might not have time traveled back quite as far as they thought for this scene.

8. Back in the day, Disney animators frequently reused old frames for new films.

(via Mental Floss)

If you think about it, your next movie ticket could really be a two-for-one deal. But somehow, I’d still feel short-changed.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/movies-reuse-footage/