The Folklore Behind The Hollywood Horror Movie ‘The Witch’ Is Truly Terrifying

If you’re a fan of genuinely creepy horror films, then you’ve probably heard about the upcoming movie from director Robert Eggers called The Witch.

So far, the reviews for the film have been stellar, and audiences are delighted by the genuinely unnerving horror of The Witch. When the credits roll and the lights go up, most people believe that everything they saw was simply a work of fiction and they have nothing to worry about, right?

Well, not so fast…

This week, Eggers sat down to talk about his new film and exactly how he researched it.

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As it turns out, the film was inspired by history, not fiction.

“In the early modern period, the real world and the fairy tale world — for everyone but the extreme intelligentsia — were the same thing. People really believed that the old lady down the lane that they were calling a ‘witch’ was actually a fairy-tale ogress, capable of doing the most horrible things,” he told the blog io9.

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“It was very easy to dig into that and be obsessed with trying to bring the audience back to the 17th century and show them a Puritan’s nightmare. I wanted to bring them back to the time when a witch was a really powerful thing, and not a cheesy plastic Halloween costume,” said Eggers.

Eggers said he also dug into writings from the time to find dialogue for the movie.

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“As I was reading, I would find sentences and phrases that worked and I would write them down constantly. Then I would organize them into different situations where they might be used,” said Eggers. “Earlier drafts of the script were these monstrous, cannibalized versions of other people’s stuff in a weird collage, which then got shaped into something that was more mine. However, there are some things that are absolutely intact. A lot of the things the children say when they’re possessed are supposedly things that children actually said when they were possessed, and so on.”

Needless to say, all of this meticulous research has paid off in a big way. It’s looking like The Witch might just be the creepiest movie of 2016. Judge for yourself in the trailer below.

(via: Daily Grail)

Personally, I can’t wait to check out this film despite the fact that I know it will scare the living daylights out of me. It’s all part of the job I suppose…

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/folk-tale-witches/

10 Things That Modern Movies Get Wrong About Vampire Stories In History.

Let’s face it. Vampires were subverted by Hollywood as a way to sell more tickets. In principle, I suppose there’s nothing wrong with this. Though, in the process, everything that used to make vampires so terrifying is now lost. (Scary vampires didn’t sparkle, for one thing.)

That said, here are 10 things that modern popular vampire culture gets wrong (or just plain ignores) about everyone’s favorite bloodsucking ghouls.

1.) The life cycle of a vampire. 

According to folklore, a vampire emerges first as a soft, blurry shape with no bones. Instead of a nose, the vampire at this stage has a sharp snout for sucking blood. If the vampire is able to stay alive for 40 days, it can start to develop bones. At that point, it’s much harder to kill.

2.) Vampires can feed on the dead. 

A widespread practice during the Black Death in Europe was to bury the dead with a rock or a brick in their mouth. This was to keep the dead from feeding on other bodies if they were to come back to life.

3.) Vampires are not always aristocrats. 

Most modern vampire stories show them as sophisticated aristocrats. Yet most vampires in popular folklore were uncultured peasants. You might even call these peasant vampires dumb.

4.) You can only kill a vampire with a stake.

Another huge misconception about vampires is that they can only be killed with a stake through the heart. According to vampire folklore, this is just not the case. Folklore is ripe with stories of vampires killed purely by cremation without needing to be staked.

Other popular methods of killing vampires include (but are not limited to) boiling the head in vinegar, burying the corpse at a crossroad, bury the corpse face down, and pour boiling oil on the body. Fun times.

5.) Vampires have powers.

No, they don’t. The idea of vampires with powers (telepathy, mind control, transforming into a bat) is a Hollywood invention. There is no traditional basis for powered vampires.

6.) How you become a vampire. 

Modern vampire mythology says that you can only become a vampire though getting bitten by another vampire. Traditionally, that’s not the only way you can become a vampire. For example, you were a risk of becoming a vampire if you were an illegitimate child, were once a werewolf, or if you had red hair. 

7.) You can avoid becoming a vampire if you’re bitten.

Legend has it that if you suspect you were bitten by a vampire, you should drink the ashes of a burnt vampire. To prevent an attack altogether, you could make bread with the blood of a vampire and eat it. Yum!

8.) Things that repel vampires.

Before Christianity, there were more ways of repelling vampires. These methods included scattering seeds, salt, iron, bells, peppermint, and running water.

9.) Vampires can have children. 

Contrary to older vampire movies and according to folklore, vampires can have children. It comes from the legend that if a dead husband came back as a vampire, the first person who he would go after would be his wife.

Sometimes the result of these encounters would be vampire sex resulting in a child. These children were considered to have powers that helped them slay vampires.

10.) Sunlight.

The idea that vampires can be killed by sunlight is also a recent invention. There is no mention of sunlight having any effect on vampires, according to folklore. 

Via: Imgur

It sounds to me that the vampires from folklore are way cooler than our modern day idea of vampires. I always thought it was kind of dumb that vampires had telepathy powers. I mean, they’re immortal and kill innocents…don’t give them more powers!

Read more: http://viralnova.com/vampire-facts/