23 Fictional Couples Who Will Restore Your Faith In Marriage

Happily married couples in movies and on TV are hard to come by…but they do exist!

1. Marshall Eriksen and Lily Aldrin from How I Met Your Mother.

CBS

CBS

 

While How I Met Your Mother was technically about Ted’s long (and ridiculously winding) road to finding a wife, most fans of the show would admit that Marshall and Lily were the actual key couple of the series. They showed that “happy couple” doesn’t automatically mean “boring couple” — in fact, quite the opposite.

Ted can wave around the blue French horn all he wants, Marshmallow and Lilypad have true intimacy…with nary an eye roll or nagging comment in sight (so rare when it comes to married couples on TV).

2. Morticia and Gomez Addams from The Addams Family.

Paramount Pictures

They’re creepy, they’re kooky…and they’re perfect for each other.

You’d be hard-pressed to find a more passionate couple than Gomez and Morticia Addams. In the words of Gomez, “I would die for her. I would kill for her. Either way, what bliss.”

3. Rob and Laura Petrie from The Dick Van Dyke Show.

 

One of the first married couples on TV who truly seemed to delight in each other’s company, Rob and Laura Petrie just had fun together. They didn’t shriek and bicker constantly (like Lucy and Ricky), nor did they get along eerily well (like the Cleavers); they were quite the dream team.

4. Jane Kerkovich-Williams and Brad Williams from Happy Endings.

ABC

ABC

 

RIP Happy Endings and RIP one of best married couples to appear on a sitcom in recent years: Jane and Brad. Always having fun together (and always all over each other), they were a couple to emulate.

5. Cory Matthews and Topanga Lawrence-Matthews from Boy Meets World.

Touchstone Television

Touchstone Television

 

Oh, Cory and Topanga: giving kids somewhat unrealistic expectations about their middle school romances since 1993. But some couples do make it! It does happen! Plus, Cory and Topanga’s relationship wasn’t turbulence-free: It had its ups and downs, and when they did end up getting married, that marriage stood the test of time. (Proof = the Disney Channel spin-off, Girl Meets World.)

6. Ellie and Carl Fredricksen from Up.

Walt Disney Pictures / Pixar Animation Studios

Walt Disney Pictures / Pixar Animation Studios

 

Ellie and Carl’s marriage takes up less than 10 minutes of the movie Up, but man oh man are those 10 gut-wrenching, tear-inducing, GIVE ME A KLEENEX PLEASE minutes.

They’re currently winning the “Which Disney Movie Has The Most Romantic Love Story?” poll, and good golly they surely deserve to. Their relationship shows that even if you never make it to Paradise Falls, marriage itself is an amazing adventure.

7. Bob and Phyllis Vance from The Office.

NBC

Pam and Jim weren’t the only happily married couple on The Office — you can’t forget Bob and Phyllis! These two are so attracted to each other that they end up deserting Jim and Pam in the midst of a double date to go get frisky in the bathroom.

His business may be refrigeration, but he definitely keeps it hot with his wife (ba-dum dum).

8. Chandler Bing and Monica Geller-Bing from Friends.

NBC

NBC

 

Could they BE any more awesome? Doubtful. Ross and Rachel, Schmoss and Schmachel: This is the couple to care about. Thank god for the drunken London hookup that brought these two lobsters together.

9. David Fisher and Keith Charles from Six Feet Under.

HBO

HBO

 

If you’ve watched Six Feet Under, you know what happens during the finale; you know that you will have permanent water damage in your apartment from all the tears that will flow from your wee eye sockets — a torrential downpour of grief.

It’s almost impossible to pick which flash-forward scenario inspires the most sobbing… just kidding, it’s Keith and David’s. First you see them finally getting married, and then before you know it — Keith passes away, and then David follows suit (dying after he thinks he sees a young Keith playing football in the distance). Tears. Oh the tears.

10. Glenn Rhee and Maggie Greene from The Walking Dead.

AMC

AMC

 

The couple that fights zombies together, stays together.

Glenn and Maggie may not legally be married, but they’ve been engaged since Season 3 and — let’s be real — wedding planning isn’t at the top of anyone’s priorities during the zombie apocalypse. They’re the best part of the show (a flare of hope amongst the carnage), and when they were separated during Season 5 it was as painful for us as it was for them.

11. Niles and Daphne Crane from Frasier.

NBC

NBC

 

Has there ever been a “will they or won’t they” couple that you’ve more desperately wanted a “will” for? Doubtful. Hearing Daphne call Dr. Crane “Niles” for the first time sends chills down a Frasier-lover’s spine. And when they finally get married? Well, it’s better than tossed salad and scrambled eggs.

12. Ben and George in Love Is Strange.

Sony Pictures Classics

Everyone in Ben and George’s lives know how deeply committed they are to each other; in fact, their nephew actually introduces his girlfriend to them as a sort of preamble to his own marriage proposal: He uses them as an example of what he hopes his own marriage will be.

13. Jin-Soo and Sun-Hwa Kwon from Lost.

ABC

ABC

 

You’ll probably start to sob just thinking of the submarine scene.

14. Stef and Lena Foster from The Fosters.

ABC Family

ABC Family

 

This is a show that doesn’t get nearly enough viewers: People get scared away by the fact that it’s on ABC Family…but they shouldn’t! The show has many virtues, but obviously the one most relevant to this post is Lena and Stef’s relationship. Their lives are full of drama, but — at least so far — all the dramatic occurrences on the show only serve to bring them closer together.

15. Madame Vastra and Jenny Flint from Doctor Who.

BBC One

BBC One

 

An odd pair (Madame Vastra is a Silurian warrior, after all), but a great one.

16. Susan and Gordon Robinson from Sesame Street.

PBS

Susan and Gordon were probably the first happily married couple you ever saw on TV.

17. Zoe and “Wash” Washburne from Firefly.

Fox

Fox

 

Zoe and Wash were great at couple-y banter and equally great at their jobs. The “great at their jobs” part of that sentence is important, because it made them into two incredibly interesting characters: They weren’t just some token “married couple” on the space ship.

18. Overton “Obie” Wakefield Jones and Synclaire James-Jones from Living Single.

Fox

While there was plenty of heat between Max and Kyle, Synclaire and Overton’s relationship (and eventual marriage) was sweet — a happy union between a laid-back guy and his lovably kooky lady. They were the cutest of cute couples.

19. Nick and Nora Charles from The Thin Man series.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

 

Drinking martinis, solving crimes, and just being a generally amazing duo (with an adorable dog to boot).

20. Dre and Rainbow Johnson from Black-ish.

ABC

One of the great things about Black-ish is the cast’s amazing chemistry — they actually seem like a real family. That goes for how the children interact with the parents, but also how Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross interact with each other; you believe in their marriage (and it’s a good one).

21. Mac and Bren MacGuff from Juno.

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Mac and Bren aren’t the main attraction of the movie Juno (obviously), but they’re an exemplary depiction of a married couple that works as a team: as parents, and in their romantic relationship.

Plus, Mac’s advice to Juno in regards to Paulie Bleeker is top-notch: “Look, in my opinion, the best thing you can do is find a person who loves you for exactly what you are. Good mood, bad mood, ugly, pretty, handsome, what have you, the right person is still going to think the sun shines out your ass. That’s the kind of person that’s worth sticking with” — he found that in Bren.

22. Kristina and Adam Braverman from Parenthood.

NBC

NBC

 

Adam and Kristina had to deal with a lot over the course of five seasons, but as the series came to a close they were still going strong. “Small victories” are important, and they knew that you need to celebrate them.

23. Tami and Eric Taylor from Friday Night Lights.

NBC / Universal

NBC / Universal

 

And finally, here we have the king and queen of happy TV marriages: Eric and Tami Taylor.

This is the sort of partnership you dream of having — not because it’s some storybook, fairy tale version of married life, but because it’s a realistic and flawed (yet still passionate and strong) portrayal of marriage.

Clear eyes, full hearts, can’t lose.

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/mallorymcinnis/eric-and-tami-taylor-forever

The Trouble With Treating Female Characters Like Meat

Liam Neeson’s new crime drama, A Walk Among the Tombstones, turns female characters into gruesome cannon fodder in a way that feels outdated, not retro.

Liam Neeson in A Walk Among the Tombstones. Atsushi Nishijima/Universal Pictures

The new Liam Neeson movie A Walk Among the Tombstones, which opens in theaters nationwide on Sept. 19, spools out its opening credits over a montage of shots of a beautiful woman. They’re all close-ups, and coyly eroticized, providing glimpses of pale skin and blonde hair. It looks like it could be a sex scene, right until the final image of her face, where we see she has tape over her mouth and there’s a tear rolling down her cheek.

It’s a neat encapsulation of what’s to come — women die horribly in order for men to avenge them soulfully in A Walk Among the Tombstones. Not exactly a new pattern in movies or on TV, but there’s something about starkness of that divide in this new film, which is written and directed by Scott Frank (The Lookout), that’s particularly striking. And, frankly, a little gross.

Adapted from the novel of the same name by crime-writing legend Lawrence Block, A Walk Among the Tombstones is a detective story of the old school, one of a series about an alcoholic ex-cop turned unlicensed private investigator named Matthew Scudder. It’s set in a gritty, dark, and resolutely drab 1999 New York, in which characters talk about Y2K and cell phones aren’t in regular use. It’s a world that’s unrepentantly masculine, which is fine, but it also uses women, or rather their deaths, as dramatic fuel, which really isn’t. The film may be a semi-period piece, but in 2014, you should have to choose — either write women as actual characters or leave them out. To use them solely as photogenic dead or soon-to-be dead bodies is to render them less than human.

Dan Stevens Atsushi Nishijima/Universal Pictures

Your tipping point on depictions of violence against women may vary. Here’s mine: Women really do get attacked, beaten, mutilated, permanently injured, raped, and killed, and removing representations of those facts from on screen won’t change that. But when your story includes women only so much as their grisly deaths make the men in their lives mad or sad, well, then you’re just turning them into meat — literally, in this case, as Scudder is hired to track down a pair of sadistic killers (David Harbour and Adam David Thompson) who kidnap women, extract ransom money from their loved ones, then leave their victims’ dismembered bodies in plastic-wrapped piles. The men they target are all involved in the higher echelons of the drug trade, including Kenny Kristo (Dan Stevens), the Brooklyn dealer who first requests Scudder’s help to catch the guys who took and murdered his wife.

The women in A Walk Among the Tombstones, as much as they exist, are shown either in angelic remove — a bright remembered smile, a set of portraits on the wall, a particularly disturbing slow-motion walk — or screaming hopelessly for their lives. This is a movie about men, from the shrewd, hard-bitten, but good-hearted Scudder to the distraught Kenny and his addict brother Howie (Eric Nelsen), from the sadistic roomies Ray (Harbour) and Albert (Thompson) to the precocious homeless kid named TJ (Astro) to whom Scudder reluctantly warms.

They may be a rough-and-tumble crowd, but they’re all depicted as fully formed people; even the creepy graveyard worker (Ólafur Darri Ólafsson) Scudder runs across during his investigation has a personality, a history, a life that’s transmitted in his few scenes. There’s no requirement that every story have strong female characters, or characters of color, or any other typically underrepresented group, though there’s a pressing need to see more of them on screen. But when your women exist only as emotional leverage for the men, well, you’re making them as disposable as your villains.

Adam David Thompson and David Harbour. Atsushi Nishijima/Universal Pictures

There are things to recommend in A Walk Among the Tombstones. Neeson is enjoyable, as always, in a quieter and more pensive tough-guy mode than the Taken films — his recent, golden run of weathered leading roles continues. It travels to corners of New York that don’t often make it to screen — rooftop pigeon coops and believably crummy Hell’s Kitchen apartments, empty Red Hook streets and Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn.

But those elements just couldn’t, for me, balance out the lingering unpleasantness of how A Walk Among the Tombstones was telling its story. It’s hollow pulp trying to pass off gloom as thematic weight, a story that creates monsters and takes pleasure in letting them run loose so that it can end on a note bemoaning what a terrible world it is.

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/alisonwillmore/the-trouble-with-treating-female-characters-like-meat

In Just A Few Steps, This Guy Built A Home Theater In His Basement…Epic!

In 2014, the number of people going to actual movie theaters hit a 20-year low.

Reasons varied from high ticket prices to lackluster movie options and an increase in streaming capabilities. But I’d argue something different altogether…

You see, when it’s so easy to build your own at-home movie theater, I can totally understand why people would rather curl up in their basement than have to deal with the overpowering smell of stale popcorn.

Don’t think it’s so simple? Well, I give you AtTheLeftThere‘s DIY creation!

Before getting to work on his basement, he sketched out his design and made sure the wiring was in order.

He painted the ceiling black for a real theater vibe.

Red walls were also key.

Wiring for the lights and electronics was hidden in the walls.

AtTheLeftThere made his own 105-inch screen out of projection cloth and pieces of pine for the frame.

Then it was time to get to work on the risers.

He opted for two-by-sixes and pieces of OSB for the platforms.

This shelving unit would hold his gaming consoles, video games, and other odds and ends.

He put carpet on the risers to prevent echoing and add a touch of coziness.

Couches and other furniture pieces went in…

Along with some old-school movie posters.

He gave it a whirl and is ultimately pretty satisfied with the results!

I’m not going to lie…

I’m pretty jealous of this home theater! While I still plan on going to the movies for 3-D films, this definitely has its own appeal. When can we come by for a viewing party?

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/basement-theater-build/

This Is Your Ultimate Sundance Film Festival Survival Guide

Do Park City like a local.

Raffi Asdourian // Creative Commons / Via Flickr: zaffi

The Sundance Film Festival can be magical, or it can be a lot of standing around outside in the cold. I’ve had both experiences over the last 10 years of attending the festival as a local. In preparation for this year’s film festival, I talked to a few friends and compiled the tips we’ve learned through much trial and error below. (If you have some words of wisdom to add, please add them in the comments below.)

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

 

Actress Rachel McAdams attends the premiere of the film A Most Wanted Man at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, Jan. 19, 2014; people wait in line to get into a Sundance Film Festival screening at the Eccles Theatre in Park City.

For starters, here are some basic facts:

• This year’s Sundance Film Festival runs from Jan. 22 to Feb. 1.

• Film screenings, panel discussions, parties, and other events take place in venues scattered throughout Park City, which is about 45 minutes southeast of Salt Lake International Airport.

• Screenings and events also take place in Salt Lake City, Ogden, and the Sundance Mountain Resort in Utah County.

How to deal with the cold:

The short answer: layer.

The longer answer: With high temperatures during the festival in the 30s (though it may go up to the low 50s next week) and lows in the teens, it’s definitely going to be cold. The good news is that Utah is very dry, so 30 degrees in Park City isn’t nearly as bad as 30 degrees in, say, New York City.

But in any case, consider the environments you’ll be in: outdoors, on buses, in semi-heated tents, and sitting in movie theaters. You need outfits that can handle all of those situations. One monster jacket is not the answer!

Warner Bros.

Instead, try this:

Coat: Wear a good, warm coat, but one that’s not too big. Remember, you’ll probably have to hold it on your lap for two hours during film screenings.

Under the coat: Sweaters, hoodies, scarves. In California, scarves are for fashion. In Park City, they’re for covering your face (and also for fashion). I usually found that three or four layers of diminishing thickness were enough to stand around for a half an hour in the waitlist line.

Head: Don’t forget a hat or earmuffs. Cold ears are not fun.

Shoes: Lightweight canvas and rubber shoes are not great for walking a lot in the snow. They get wet, and then your feet are cold for the rest of the day.

Still cold? If you need a quick way to warm up at Sundance, hop on one of the free buses circling the city (more on the buses below).

Michael R Perry // Creative Commons / Via Flickr: michaelrperry

How to see movies when you don’t have tickets:

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

If you want to see a film but don’t have tickets, the waitlist is definitely worth trying. In fact, the waitlist is a classic part of Sundance and worth doing just for the experience.

Using the waitlist in past involved showing up very early and getting numbered slips of paper. It rewarded those who worked the hardest to see films. Last year, however, the festival debuted an electronic system that was buggy, frustratingly required electronic registration, and rewarded whoever had the fastest internet connection. Frankly, it wasn’t great.

This is what standby numbers looked like last year. s3.amazonaws.com

Still, using the waitlist means hanging out for a while with a bunch of independent film buffs who braved the cold to see a movie. So, potential friends. I’ve also attended plenty of Sundance films for free because someone with extra tickets happened to be hanging out around the waitlist line.

Using the waitlist now involves getting a number electronically on your phone, then arriving 30 minutes before show time and lining up in numerical order. Then just before the film starts, the empty seats are sold for $15 (cash only) to people in line. For full instructions, click here or watch this instructional video:

Where to eat and drink:

Here’s the thing with eating at Sundance: Park City has a tourist economy, which doesn’t necessarily lead to a lot of high-quality, good-value restaurants. In my experience, food in Park City tends to vary between generic mid-price options and what I think of as “Faux Rustic Beverly Hills.” So as a general rule, try to get as far away from the tourist crowds as possible.

That said, after talking with a few friends, this is the list we came up with for Park City:

• El Chubasco: Mexican food away from the crush of the festival crowds.

• Wasatch Brewpub: Wasatch Brewery operates two brewpubs, including one on Main Street in Park City. There’s a full menu, plus local beers with Utah-themed names like Polygamy Porter and Provo Girl.

• Java Cow: A coffee shop on Main Street that opens before the first film screenings and festival events in the mornings.

• Chimayo: This place isn’t cheap, but it’s well-regarded, creative, and located right on Main Street.

And here are a few places to eat in Salt Lake City:

• Eva: A cozy, small plates restaurant just a few blocks from several Sundance venues. I recommend asking to be seated in the back section of the restaurant. Also try Eva’s Bakery, just up the street, which is a French-style bakery and delicious.

• Copper Onion: A perennial contender for the best restaurant in Salt Lake City, the Copper Onion is both a local favorite and immediately adjacent to the Broadway Theater, Salt Lake City’s biggest Sundance venue.

• Juniors: A tiny little bar in Salt Lake City frequented by local newspaper reporters, among others.

• Bruges Waffles and Frites: The most delicious Belgian waffles anywhere. Bruges has expanded to become a small local chain in the last few years, but the downtown Salt Lake City shop is both the original and most charming location.

• The Rose Establishment: Just around the corner from Bruges, this coffee shop is delicious and occupies a warm space carved out of an old warehouse.

Also note: Wine and liquor are only sold in Utah at state liquor stores (grocery stores sell beer). In Park City, the state liquor stores are located at 460 Swede Alley and 1550 Snow Creek Drive.

And a second note: The Park Record has put together a list of restaurants that are closed during the Sundance Film Festival.

Barnaby Dorfman // Creative Commons / Via Flickr: bdorfman

Where to pee:

UPDATE: Readers have alerted us that some of the restrooms that were available in the past may no longer be accessible. However, Allison Butz of the Historic Park City Alliance told BuzzFeed News there will be four public restrooms available during this year’s festival. They are located at the Old Town Transit Center, next door to the Park City Museum at 528 Main Street, at Miners Park on Main Street across from the post office, and in the parking lot of the Wasatch Brewpub.

How to stay healthy:

Park City sits about 7,000 feet above sea level and it’s often bone dry. If you’re coming from a coastal city, give yourself time to adjust by going easy on the alcohol for the first day or two and drinking plenty of water. Continue drinking more water than usual throughout the festival.

How to get around:

Don’t bring a car to Sundance unless you absolutely need it. Instead, avoid snowy, slippery streets and use Park City’s excellent free bus system. (The Sundance Institute describes the buses as “free shuttles,” but Park City’s buses are always free.)

During the festival, the stops are clearly marked and are located at every Park City venue. Bus drivers are generally kind and helpful. Sundance has information about the buses on its website, as does Park City, though it may be easiest to just to show up and give it a try. Keep in mind that Park City is very small and you don’t need to be a public transit pro to master the bus system.

Leaving Park City without a car is a little bit trickier, but doable. There’s more info on how to do that at the end of this post.

Michael R Perry // Creative Commons / Via Flickr: michaelrperry

How to park for free and without stress in Park City:

If you are driving to Park City — or from your hotel into the heart of town — use the Monitor Drive parking lot.

Located at 2300 Monitor Drive, this park and ride is actually a Mormon church parking lot — so it’s closed on Sundays. But the rest of the time, it’s free and typically has spaces. It’s not within walking distance of most venues, but the free bus picks up right by the entrance (there will be signs). The alternative is fighting traffic over narrow, frozen streets to get to a comparatively expensive lot. Trust me, park on Monitor Drive.

The Park Record also has a comprehensive list of where parking is available and how much it costs.

Where to see Banksy art in Park City:

InSapphoWeTrust // Creative Commons / Via Flickr: skinnylawyer

Banksy came through Park City in 2010 when Exit Through the Gift Shop was screening and left behind at least four pieces of street art. Not all of them survived, but the best-known piece is protected under glass on the side of Java Cow, at 402 Main Street.

Another surviving Bansky, depicting a kneeling angel boy, is located on the side of a parking garage at 537 Main Street. That piece was damaged in late 2013, but “painstakingly restored” last year.

youtube.com

How to avoid crowds:

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

 

Sundance is absolutely packed, but only at certain times and on certain days. If you’ve had enough of the crowds, try these tips:

1. Get up early. Even during the first weekend of the festival, Park City is vastly quieter in the mornings than it is at night.

2. Stay through the second weekend. The biggest celebrities, parties, and crowds converge during the first weekend of Sundance. That bustle can be fun, but for a more laid-back experience stick around for the last few days. The festival has an entirely different atmosphere toward the end, and events and screening are much, much easier to get into.

3. Be friendly. Almost everyone you see “working” at Sundance is actually a volunteer. They are regular people with whom niceness opens doors. Literally. Like, doors to warmer places where there isn’t a big crowd.

4. Leave Park City. More on this below.

Jim Dalrymple II

How to experience Sundance like a local:

When I asked my Utah friends how to have the best Sundance experience, they almost uniformly said the same thing: Get out of Park City. The consensus is that Park City is crowded, expensive, and generally the least Utah-like place in Utah.

To get out of Park City without a car, take the 902 bus. The bus picks up at the Old Town Transit Center, at 558 Swede Alley, near Main Street. It drops off a little more than an hour later at 200 South and Main Street in Salt Lake City, which is within walking distance of several Sundance venues. Or take the bus to its final stop at the Salt Lake Central Station, where trains depart regularly for Ogden and Provo.

Note that this bus is not free and, because it’s designed for commuters, only runs in the morning and late afternoon. Check the schedule here. If you run into trouble, ask the driver for help, or try tweeting the Utah Transit Authority’s generally responsive and helpful Twitter profile.

Getting out of Park City definitely requires some effort, but the reward is a more low-key and authentic Utah experience.

Helpful links:

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/jimdalrympleii/ultimate-sundance-film-festival-survival-guide

20 Things That Always Happen In Movies But Would Never Happen In Real Life. These Are Great.

Ever noticed how in the movies no one ever goes to the toilet, unless it’s a comedy? Or how lights always make a crazy noise when being turned on? It’s all part of Hollywood’s movie logic that just seems to be law when it comes to film-making. Check out these other examples of funny movie logic below:

Obviously these are somewhat of generalization of all movies, but still pretty valid generalizations. Share these examples of movie logic with your friends below.

Read more: http://viralnova.com/movie-logic/

A reboot for ‘Vacation’ and more James Bond, Jason Bourne and Zoolander

http://twitter.com/#!/MarnieLevy/status/511856511417851904

Because Hollywood can’t seem to come up with any new ideas, here are a few of the films America will be burdened with in the near future.

First up, a reboot of the Chevy Chase–Christie Brinkley masterpiece from 1983, ‘Vacation’:

Leslie Mann joins New Line’s ‘Vacation’ reboot as Audrey Griswold http://t.co/Y1wfBQG36C pic.twitter.com/j7sijOaxAT

— Variety (@Variety) September 15, 2014

Next, who’s ready for more James Bond? With Sam Mendes (“Skyfall”) directing:

Bond 24: New James Bond movie 'to begin filming on December 6' http://t.co/eJaNGkYOvG

— DS Breaking News (@digitalspybrk) September 16, 2014

And how about Matt Damon back as Jason Bourne?

Happy but surprising news. Bourne is back. http://t.co/t8euh06NIA

— Sarah Crompton (@Sarahc_k) September 16, 2014

That’s depressing as we were looking forward to another Bourne movie where would could compare Andy Levy of Fox to Jeremy Renner:

Andy Levy Totally Looks Like Jeremy Renner http://t.co/JWyVPvlSfu @andylevy and @JerRenner

— Jordan Olling (@jordanolling) March 17, 2013

But this confuses us. More “Zoolander”? People really want more of this?

Will Ferrell says Magatu will return for 'Zoolander 2' #WillFerrell https://t.co/p0zJ47TBXf pic.twitter.com/RRkM3jpBQt

— Reality TV World (@realitytvworld2) September 16, 2014

Exit question: when will we get the remake of “Casablanca” or “The Godfather”? You just know that eventually Hollywood will do it and we might as well get it over with now.

 

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2014/09/16/movie-news-a-reboot-for-vacation-and-more-bond-bourne-and-zoolander-good-news-or-wtf-are-they-thinking/

These 34 Behind-The-Scenes Photos Will Change How You Feel About Movies Forever.

For years, movie magic has been “tricking” audiences in to believing that some fantastical worlds and stories are real. Most movie goers know that they are being duped. After all, that’s the best part of going to the movies. Suspending disbelief and accepting an entire world as truth can be fun… even if it’s just for 90 minutes of your life. Here are some behind-the-scenes photos from some of the most iconic movies over the decades. No matter how much you love these movies (or how many times you’ve seen them), we bet you’ve never pictured them like this before. It’s mind-blowing… and it makes me love these movies even more. I’ve never seen this stuff before!

1.) Princess Leia gives Luke a refreshing beer.

2.) An Alien doesn’t seem so scary.

3.) Jaws must not have been hungry that day.

4.) Star Wars wasn’t very high tech…

5.) Is this the Hulk or Bruce Banner?

6.) Just chillaxin’ with friends.

7.) The Hound with and without makeup.

8.) Even Bellatrix Lestrange has to check her email.

9.) Amazing winter scene or… diorama?

10.) Who knew the Delorean was so small?

11.) Inception blew your mind in more ways than you know.

12.) Bill Murray behind the scenes on Fantastic Mr. Fox.

13.) We all re-touch our makeup down here.

14.) No one likes getting wet. Even wizards.

15.) Frodo’s epic journey would have went so much faster in a helicopter.

16.) Dr. Pepper: the refreshing drink of serial killers.

17.) Not only was there room on the door for both of them, but they were just in a small pool.

Read more: http://viralnova.com/behind-the-scenes-photos/

Here Are 21 Things You Totally Missed In Your Favorite Movies.

Watching movies is one of America’s favorite past-times for a reason. Going to the theater and grabbing a bag of popcorn and Junior Mints is like a taking a time machine back to your childhood. You probably have a few favorite movies from over the decades and watched them a bajillion times. But I bet you’ve never caught any of these things. Someone found these 21 weird details you won’t be able to believe you ever missed. (Seriously, we can’t NOT see them now.)

1. 1980’s special effects at the their finest.

2. We know girls hate wearing heels all day but this is ridiculous.

3. How on Earth did this make it into the film?

4. Please tell me someone rescued him.

5. I knew there was a cameo… SOMEWHERE.

6. Can’t believe I didn’t see this before.

7. Umm, oops.

8. [Grin].

9. Because why not?

10. Who needs CGI when you have super young Matt Damon?

11. G-ross.

12. Spot on.

13. Oh J.J. Abrams, were you ALWAYS trying to audition for Star Wars?

14. Cutting edge games in Tron.

15. Lol why?

16. Ya, never saw THAT.

17. Why didn’t they use another take?

18. Mind blown.

19. I mean, I think it’s cool too.

20. E.T. CAME HOME!!!

21. Ouch!

(H/T: eBaum’s World) Don’t let this ruin your childhood or move-going experience. As much as we hate to admit it, Hollywood can sometimes make mistakes. Do you think your friends will recognize some of these slip-ups or hidden easter eggs? Click below to share this with them!

Read more: http://viralnova.com/easter-eggs/