OUCH: Conservative women (and others) TORCH Salma Hayek’s ‘sexist stereotypes’ disguised as feminism

Who’s up for a few words of who has it “easy” and who doesn’t from a Hollywood actress who is married to a billionaire and seconded by a Guardian opinion writer?

Read more: http://twitchy.com/dougp-3137/2017/08/11/ouch-conservative-women-and-others-torch-salma-hayeks-sexist-stereotypes-disguised-as-feminism/

What Sofia Vergara’s Emmys Sketch Means For Latinas

You spin me right ‘round. And I’m not liking it.

1. By now, you’ve probably seen some of the chatter surrounding Sofia Vergara’s sketch at the Emmys.

NBC

It involved Vergara posing on a giant spinning platform, the joke being that her Latina-brand hotness would provide a welcome distraction from a boring speech (which mentioned diversity) by Television Academy CEO and chairman Bruce Rosenblum. But for many on Twitter, the stunt was more cringe-worthy than funny.

2. Vergara has responded to the backlash, telling her critics to “lighten up.”

Fox / Via whatculture.com

“I think its absolutely the opposite,” she said. “It means that somebody can be hot and also be funny and make fun of herself. I think it’s ridiculous that somebody started this — I know who she was — who has no sense of humor [and should] lighten up a little bit.”

And some agree. At Mediaite, Cathy Reisenwitz wrote, “Vergara stepped up on that pedestal because she had something to say about her industry. If you can’t hear it over the sound of her beautiful body, that is your malfunction.”

3. No word on who Vergara thinks “started this.”

Paramount Pictures / Via soletstalkabout.com

Who invites you to tea and then won’t serve it? Come on, Sofia.

4. But pop culture events that play out in front of a large audience aren’t just about one person at one moment.

Columbia Pictures / Via reactiongifs.us

Vergara’s participation in that sketch — and the fact that it was pitched, written, and approved — makes this moment bigger than Sofia Vergara. This moment is about Latina representation in general.

5. So. Let’s put the sketch in context.

Disney / Via tumblr.com

We live at a point in history where women in general and Latinas in particular are both underrepresented in popular media, as well as portrayed in a sexualized and stereotypical manner more often than not.

6. If Vergara’s partcipation in the sketch was an attempt to satirize that reality, it fell flat…

..and there’s a reason for that.

7. Here are just a few examples of her participation in maintaining a stereotypical portrayal of Latinas:

ABC / Via lovebabymama.com

11. See what I mean?

It’s not successful satire if you’re complicit in the problem you’re satirizing.

12. And the truth is that Sofia Vergara is better than these roles.

Bravo / Via i.perezhilton.com

She has great comedic timing. She’s business-savvy, extending her brand to include clothing, accessories, and jewelry. She’s marketable, landing endorsement deals for giant brands like Head & Shoulders and Pepsi. She’s won a SAG Award, a Glamour Award for her comedic skills, and even an NAACP Image Award. She’s been the highest-paid actress on television “by a long shot” for two years running. She’s at a point in her career where she could make a point of demanding better, more nuanced (and still funny) material.

13. But she doesn’t.

Besides defending the Emmys sketch, she has also defended Modern Family against critics’ claims that the show’s creative team has a problem when it comes to race and ethnicity, and that her character can veer into stereotypical territory.

And so things remain the same…

14. …which has a very real impact on the women, especially Latina women, who are Vergara’s peers.

Columbia Pictures / Via tumblr.com

Taking the easier path will, more often that not, leave the path a little less smooth and a lot more cluttered with obstacles and garbage for those who journey behind you. A great example of how that domino effect has played out for black actresses and characters is The Grio’s post on “the changing image of the African-American ‘leading lady.’

15. Of course Sofia Vergara has agency. Of course she gets to decide what to do with her body and with her image.

CW / Via tumblr.com

And that’s just the problem. The choices she is making don’t exist in a vacuum. No one actress can or should represent an entire diverse ethnicity, but the fact remains that 1) there are very few visible, powerful Latinas in Hollywood, and 2) she is one of them.

And so the choices she makes have a very real impact on the way Latinas are represented in popular culture, the roles that are seen as being in demand, and the stories deemed worth the time and money it takes to make them.

16. I just hope she keeps that in mind.

ABC / Via tumblr.com

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/alexalvarez/what-is-satire-even

In the 2008 Presidential Election, We Don’t Care if We are Sexist, Racist or Biased

W e are what we are, fabricated over years of exposure to the realities of our lives.  If you were attacked or mugged by a member of a specific race, you likely harbor a prejudice against that race.  If you were impoverished, oppressed by or at war with a race of people, you likely have a bias against them.  And sexism touches us all from the “glass ceiling” to the destruction of “father’s rights” by the women’s movement to the horrors of rape.  There are so many other facets of racism and sexism that span the globe that one could write a book the size of “War and Peace” and not cover them all.

The sexist card is hard to totally understand.  Many men blame it on a women’s movement that has made every attempt to minimize the importance of men, especially fathers, in their children’s lives.  But sexism and abuse of women was around long before there was any solidified women’s movement.

Women, on the other hand, want equal wages and fair consideration, and because of physical differences, suffer at the hands of men.  Internationally, sexist acts against women are rampant and the indignations they suffer are broad-based.  In some societies, they are deprived of basic education to ensure their advancement in society is impaired and their social status retained as subservient to men.

In America, it is quite possible the pendulum has swung too far, when a female population that outnumbers men is treated like a minority.  But world-wide, that is anything but the truth.

The sexism issue is an important one from a political standpoint.  Statistically, women vote more than men, and women of voting age outnumber men.  One has to only go to political websites to find that almost every candidate addresses women’s rights, while few address the rights of men.  If you want the vote of women, you don’t mess with the sexist argument and if you want the vote of the aged, you don’t mess with Social Security and Medicare.  And what do we call the equivalent of racism against the aged?  Aged-ism?  Plenty of that against McCain, as there was against Reagan.

These two issues go way beyond what is stated here and they have become a central focal point of who we are as a nation.  Most of us do not wish to be classified as racist or sexist, but in some measure, we all are, whether we admit it or not.  In humor, Avenue Q, a Broadway Show has a tune they include in their performance, in which they sing, “Everyone’s a little bit racist…sometimes….”.  We would add sexist and just about every other bias to that.

And so enters politics, in which we expect the candidate to be a perfect reflection of our ideals.  As such, no politician wants to be considered sexist or racist, and yet, by their own nature they must be.  So, when you see one or the other play the racism or sexism card against their opponent, one has to examine the motivations behind their statements and the likely desire to cover up who they themselves truly are.

That aside, one thing to examine closely on the internet with respect to the Presidential Election is how both sides are playing the sexist and racist cards as we write this.

Here are the various claims:

1. If you don’t vote Republican, you are sexist.
2. If you don’t vote for Obama, you are racist.
3. The Republican’s choosing a woman as a VP candidate was sexist.
4. Had the Republicans chosen a black man as a VP candidate, that would be racist.
5. Obama choosing a white man as a running mate was racist.
6. If you think Obama is a Muslim, you are a racist.
7. If you voted for Obama over Hillary you are a sexist.
8. If you resent Obama’s choice of a male VP over Hillary, you are a sexist.
9. Obama was sexist for choosing a man as a VP when Hillary was available.
10. Bill was a pig for fooling around with Monica.

We have read some of these with disbelief in how twisted some people have become in classifying others as sexist or racist.  The reverse logic is the most twisted.  When one uses the logic that the only reason to choose a woman for a political office is because you are sexist, then, of course, that in and of itself is sexist against women by definition, the ultimate sexist catch 22, in which your opponent is damned if they do and damned if they do not.  When one says that you should never choose a black man for office because it would show you were trying to play the race card, again, you oppress all black men that were excellent choices for that office.

We would like to see this election steer clear of these issues, but we also know that other issues, such as Roe vs. Wade will find their way into the debates and they, in and of themselves have sexist overtones.

We just find most often, when one political candidate accuses the other of either sexism or racism, they are most often calling the kettle black.  It isn’t that simple, but in an effort to divide the nation into votes for their respective candidates, an attempt to simplify things into cut and dry categorizations is attempted, and life is not as simple as they paint it.

Our conclusion…

If a headline accuses the other side of being sexist or racist, realize it is most likely sensationalism to sway your vote.  You may, just may, find you want to read it with skepticism if not downright contempt, and possibly consider the authors’ desire to direct you away from their own weaknesses with respect to these broad-based issues.