10 Things That Modern Movies Get Wrong About Vampire Stories In History.

Let’s face it. Vampires were subverted by Hollywood as a way to sell more tickets. In principle, I suppose there’s nothing wrong with this. Though, in the process, everything that used to make vampires so terrifying is now lost. (Scary vampires didn’t sparkle, for one thing.)

That said, here are 10 things that modern popular vampire culture gets wrong (or just plain ignores) about everyone’s favorite bloodsucking ghouls.

1.) The life cycle of a vampire. 

According to folklore, a vampire emerges first as a soft, blurry shape with no bones. Instead of a nose, the vampire at this stage has a sharp snout for sucking blood. If the vampire is able to stay alive for 40 days, it can start to develop bones. At that point, it’s much harder to kill.

2.) Vampires can feed on the dead. 

A widespread practice during the Black Death in Europe was to bury the dead with a rock or a brick in their mouth. This was to keep the dead from feeding on other bodies if they were to come back to life.

3.) Vampires are not always aristocrats. 

Most modern vampire stories show them as sophisticated aristocrats. Yet most vampires in popular folklore were uncultured peasants. You might even call these peasant vampires dumb.

4.) You can only kill a vampire with a stake.

Another huge misconception about vampires is that they can only be killed with a stake through the heart. According to vampire folklore, this is just not the case. Folklore is ripe with stories of vampires killed purely by cremation without needing to be staked.

Other popular methods of killing vampires include (but are not limited to) boiling the head in vinegar, burying the corpse at a crossroad, bury the corpse face down, and pour boiling oil on the body. Fun times.

5.) Vampires have powers.

No, they don’t. The idea of vampires with powers (telepathy, mind control, transforming into a bat) is a Hollywood invention. There is no traditional basis for powered vampires.

6.) How you become a vampire. 

Modern vampire mythology says that you can only become a vampire though getting bitten by another vampire. Traditionally, that’s not the only way you can become a vampire. For example, you were a risk of becoming a vampire if you were an illegitimate child, were once a werewolf, or if you had red hair. 

7.) You can avoid becoming a vampire if you’re bitten.

Legend has it that if you suspect you were bitten by a vampire, you should drink the ashes of a burnt vampire. To prevent an attack altogether, you could make bread with the blood of a vampire and eat it. Yum!

8.) Things that repel vampires.

Before Christianity, there were more ways of repelling vampires. These methods included scattering seeds, salt, iron, bells, peppermint, and running water.

9.) Vampires can have children. 

Contrary to older vampire movies and according to folklore, vampires can have children. It comes from the legend that if a dead husband came back as a vampire, the first person who he would go after would be his wife.

Sometimes the result of these encounters would be vampire sex resulting in a child. These children were considered to have powers that helped them slay vampires.

10.) Sunlight.

The idea that vampires can be killed by sunlight is also a recent invention. There is no mention of sunlight having any effect on vampires, according to folklore. 

Via: Imgur

It sounds to me that the vampires from folklore are way cooler than our modern day idea of vampires. I always thought it was kind of dumb that vampires had telepathy powers. I mean, they’re immortal and kill innocents…don’t give them more powers!

Read more: http://viralnova.com/vampire-facts/

5 Abandoned Asylums Whose Backstories Would Make For Terrifying Movies.

Most people are familiar with the old axiom that real life is stranger than fiction. This is absolutely true in old mental health facilities around the United States.

The public mental health system was a corrupt and overcrowded nightmare before the modern era of mostly privatized mental health facilities. These five facilities did some amazing work in their prime. However, when budgets dropped and patient loads increased, they became terrifying spectacles of human pain and suffering.

Hollywood horror films have nothing on these places.

1.) Danvers State Hospital.

This hospital was built in Danvers, Massachusetts in 1887 with the intention of delivering compassionate care and treatment to the mentally ill. However, that focus on compassion caused the number of patients within Danvers to increase. The structure was designed to accommodate just 600 patients, but by 1939, more than 2,000 patients were packed into the building.

As you might imagine, this lead to severe overcrowding and patient neglect. Danvers was also the birthplace of the ever-popular lobotomy. The procedure was used liberally on scores of patients crowding the facility. That’s almost too horrifying to even imagine.

2.) Topeka State Hospital.

Topeka State Hospital became better as time went on, but when it was bad, oh boy was it bad. The story that made this hospital infamous happened when a journalist when to visit the facility during the early 1900s. The first thing he saw was a patient strapped to a bed. The patient was there for so long that his skin had started to grow over the restraints. Among the other horrors at the facility during that time were patients chained up naked for months at a time.

The state of Kansas ordered a panel to study and fix the problems at the facility in 1948. Things surprisingly got better after this. By the time the facility shut down in 1997, Topeka State Hospital was one of the leading psychiatric facilities in the country. It’s still pretty horrifying that they used to chain up their patients like that.

3.) Fernald State School.

This facility originally served as a home for troubled and disabled young boys. For many of the children there, it was actually more like a prison camp. The boys received an extreme level of abuse from both their fellow children and the facility leaders. They also received a sub par education. The worst thing that happened to these boys was definitely the Quaker Oats radiation experiment.

In the 1950s, researchers at MIT fed members of the Fernald science club irradiated Quaker Oats as a way to study how the body absorbs radiation. Though the dose of radiation was not fatal, Quaker Oats and MIT still paid out a huge settlement to members of the science club. Parts of the Fernald facility are still in operation today, and serves as home for mentally disabled adults.

4.) Trenton State Hospital.

The Trenton State Hospital, like so many on this list, began its life with the best of intentions. All this changed when Dr. Henry Cotton became the hospital director in 1907. While Cotton did some good things for the facility, his unique theory on mental illness would doom many patients.

Cotton believed that all mental illness was caused by infections, and began to perform invasive surgery on patients in an attempt to cure their illness. He boasted a success rate of 85 percent, but that’s only because many patients did not survive these operations. Most of these surgeries were also performed against the patient’s will. Cotton remained at Trenton until 1930. The facility is still in operation today, but parts of the campus are abandoned.

5.) Metropolitan State Hospital.

Metropolitan suffered from many of the same problems as the other hospitals on this list. However, it’s well known for the death of Anna Marie Davee. Davee was a patient at Metropolitan, who suddenly disappeared in 1978. In 1980, her killer was discovered as a fellow patient, Melvin Wilson.

Wilson took police to the two graves that he buried Davee in. If that wasn’t creepy enough, Wilson kept 7 of Davee’s teeth with him as a memento after he killed her. The facility was completely closed down in 1992.

Via: io9

Jeez, these are creepy. Why doesn’t Hollywood draw from any of these real life stories for their new horror films? They’d be so much better than what’s out there right now. The story behind Trenton State Hospital is still sending shivers down my spine. 

Read more: http://viralnova.com/abandoned-asylums-backstories/